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Adrian & Alaïa, the past recomposed

Until June 23rd, the fondation Azzedine Alaïa presents the exhibition Adrian & Alaïa – L’art du tailleur ". The opportunity to discover the modernity of the costumer Adrian and the perfection of the cut of Azzedine Alaïa . The tailors of one begin a silent dialogue with the other, beyond time. - Isabelle Cerboneschi, Paris.

May 17th

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Exhibition view AZZEDINE ALAÏA - COLLECTOR © Stéphane Aït Ouarab / Fashion in Images

Twenty seven suits by Hollywood costume designer Adrian converse in silence with twenty-seven pieces of tailors and coats of Azzedine Alaïa . What do they tell us, what is passing between them, eyes dipped into the seams or this detail of buttoning on this jacket difficult so to date? It could have been created in 1940 or in 1980. It is the slight fatigue of the fabric which informs us and tells us that this garment has seen another life. This shouldered jacket, very slightly pulled in at the waist, tells us about the fashion, this eternal return, to this past that designers and couturiers constantly re-visit. There are those who do it with genius. Azzedine Alaïa is one of them.

This is the first time that the fondation Azzedine Alaïa has shown some of the work of the designer in relation to certain pieces that belonged to his huge private collection. Adrian, who was costume director at the MGM, shaped the image of Greta Garbo, Katharine Hepburn, Joan Crawford, and many huge stars as Azzedine Alaïa admired. He also dressed Garbo for whom he had created a coat, which he bought back later in an auction.

"In the 1980's, Azzedine was called by the son of Adrian who wanted to give somebody of stature a part of the archives of his father and sell them, explains Olivier Saillard, the curator of the exhibition. Azzedine raised the necessary funds and bought everything. He owns 150 pieces, evening dresses, daywear, but with Carla Sozzani, the president of the foundation, felt that for the show tailoring would be more interesting. "

The creations of the costume designer are leaning against the wall while those of the couturier are set in the center of the room. There is a reason for this. "Adrian's clothes are often very elaborate from the front, say gold but on the back, there is nothing, explains Olivier Saillard. They were cinematographic pieces made to be seen from the front. In Azzedine they are sassy. That's why we put his creations in the middle because no matter where you are, you can turn around and there is something to see. "

While walking around the exhibition, one discovers what connected the two men, this art of the cut, the details. "Both are working on a kind of fuzzy tailor. It's very light, not starched, explains Olivier Saillard. At Adrian, who had a fashion brand between 1943 to 1951 there is no corset, no support, no Basque. It's a very Hollywood silhouette, much more Schiaparelli than Dior. "

Both rely on fit, Azzedine Alaïa probably a little more. Because he loved women, their daring and their shapes, and his clothes whispered in the ears to those who wore them: "Stand up and go ..."

AZZEDINE ALAÏA – COLLECTIONNEUR – ADRIAN & ALAIA – L’ART DU TAILLEUR, under the direction ofOlivier Saillard – Galerie Azzedine Alaïa – 18 rue de la Verrerie – Paris 4euntil 23rd June 2019

Adrian & Alaïa, the past recomposed

May 17th

[Click on the image to see the gallery]

Until June 23rd, the fondation Azzedine Alaïa presents the exhibition Adrian & Alaïa – L’art du tailleur ". The opportunity to discover the modernity of the costumer Adrian and the perfection of the cut of Azzedine Alaïa . The tailors of one begin a silent dialogue with the other, beyond time. - Isabelle Cerboneschi, Paris.

Twenty seven suits by Hollywood costume designer Adrian converse in silence with twenty-seven pieces of tailors and coats of Azzedine Alaïa . What do they tell us, what is passing between them, eyes dipped into the seams or this detail of buttoning on this jacket difficult so to date? It could have been created in 1940 or in 1980. It is the slight fatigue of the fabric which informs us and tells us that this garment has seen another life. This shouldered jacket, very slightly pulled in at the waist, tells us about the fashion, this eternal return, to this past that designers and couturiers constantly re-visit. There are those who do it with genius. Azzedine Alaïa is one of them.

This is the first time that the fondation Azzedine Alaïa shows some of the work of the designer in relation to certain pieces that belonged to his huge collection. Adrian, who was costume director at the MGM, shaped the image of Greta Garbo, Katharine Hepburn, Joan Crawford, as many huge women as Azzedine Alaia admired. He also dressed Garbo for whom he had created a coat, which he bought later in an auction.

"In the 1980's, Azzedine was called by the son of Adrian who wanted to give somebody of stature a part of the archives of his father and sell them, explains Olivier Saillard, the curator of the exhibition. Azzedine raised the necessary funds and bought everything. He owns 150 pieces, evening dresses, daywear, but with Carla Sozzani, the president of the foundation, felt that for the show tailoring would be more interesting. "

The creations of the costume designer are leaning against the wall while those of the couturier are set in the center of the room. There is a reason for this. "Adrian's clothes are often very elaborate from the front, say gold but on the back, there is nothing, explains Olivier Saillard. They were cinematographic pieces made to be seen from the front. In Azzedine they are sassy. That's why we put his creations in the middle because no matter where you are, you can turn around and there is something to see. "

While walking around the exhibition, one discovers what connected the two men, this art of the cut, the details. "Both are working on a kind of fuzzy tailor. It's very light, not starched, explains Olivier Saillard. At Adrian, who had a fashion brand between 1943 to 1951 there is no corset, no support, no Basque. It's a very Hollywood silhouette, much more Schiaparelli than Dior. "

Both rely on fit, Azzedine Alaïa probably a little more. Because he loved women, their daring and their shapes, and his clothes whispered in the ears to those who wore them: "Stand up and go ..."

AZZEDINE ALAÏA – COLLECTIONNEUR – ADRIAN & ALAIA – L’ART DU TAILLEUR, under the direction ofOlivier Saillard – Galerie Azzedine Alaïa – 18 rue de la Verrerie – Paris 4euntil 23rd June 2019