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Dior X Tomaso Binga: When the spirit of feminism takes hold of fashion

Fashion Week, Paris: Maria Grazia Chiuri invited Italian feminist artist Tomaso Binga to Dior to stage the autumn-winter XNUMX-XNUMX show. The artistic director of the house continues to build her vocabulary, summoning some silhouettes of the past to find an answer to the questions of our time, including the place of women in society. To support her remarks, she summoned a figure of feminism: Tomaso Binga and her famous Alfabetiere murale . - Isabelle Cerboneschi , meet her in Paris.

February 28 2019

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Dior, 2019-2020 Fall-Winter Collection. Photo: © Sarah Pintadosi for Dior.

Dior, autumn-winter 2019-2020 show. Photo: © Dior.

In the garden of Musée Rodin , a white, rectangular building, sports the letters DIOR, written in a particular alphabet: each letter is formed by a body of a naked woman, the body of the Italian artist Tomaso Binga. It is to her that Maria Grazia Chiuri, the artistic director of Dior used the signs for the fall-winter XNUMX-XNUMX ready-to-wear fashion show. Since her arrival Dior, the Italian designer has used the podium to scroll not only clothes but also feminist slogans. "We should all be feminist", was written on a T-Shirt during his first collection. "Sisterhood is Powerful" reads the first look of the show. A sort of revolution upside down that, if it were to take place, would come down from the courtyard to the street.

For this fall-winter collection 2019-20 she was inspired by the figures of the Teddy Girls, the female counterparts of the Teddy Boys in the 1950, one of the first subcultures that emerged in England. Their style was a joyful blend of Edwardian rock and roll. They wore men's jackets, leather jackets, rolled up jeans, DA-style hairstyles and were in revolt against post-war austerity.

It is these figures of rebellious women who inspired Maria Grazia Chiuri. There is a trace of this in the use of tartan, which later became part of the punks' uniform. She revisits the tailor's line and gives it a more masculine look. It rethinks the black jacket created by Yves Saint Laurent for Dior and the Miss Dior dress of the late 1940, and it does something else: a look that seems cut for Millennials rich and (a little) rebellious. Not to mention the famous T-Shirts with themes. The show opens with the words of the American poet Robin Morgan dating from 1984: "Sisterhood is Global".

And to support her words, Maria Grazia Chiuri asked the Italian artist Tomaso Binga to create the scenography of the parade. Bianca Pucciarelli Menna, his real name, was born in Salerno in 1931. But it was when she chose to rename Tomaso, a name she borrowed from the poet Filippo Tommaso Marinetti (1876-1944), that she reinvented herself and chose to build a protest and feminist work, She was shocked by the way women were treated, and still treated, in her country and elsewhere. Installed in Rome in the 1970 years, she intended to shake the established order through disturbing happenings, using disguise. During one of these artistic moments, she even disguised herself as a pope and invited the audience to confess their sins and give them absolution.

In 1976, the artist created " l’Alfabetiere murale », a vast collage in which letters of the alphabet and her own body mix with each other, which she contorsions to make her represent a letter of the alphabet. This work is meant to be a critique of the use of women's bodies "that men use to advertise cars and many other things," she says. Thomas Binga opened the parade with this sentence: "As women and feminists we must manage ourselves and this revolt will be our silent victory". She was surrounded by two models wearing slogan t-shirts: "Sisterhood is global" and "Sisterhood is Powerful", in tribute to the works of the poet Robin Morgan, whose work is based on the concept of sorority. On the day of the parade, the artist wore a dress that she had made herself with two dresses, one of which had become too small. And that made her laugh. Meet.

IC: Is fashion a language that can destroy stereotypes?
Tomaso Binga: Fashion can be political, but it has to find different channels as well as it's not just business.

Why take a male name?
It was a provocation. It was also a performance. All women who work in art did not need to change their name. It was by taking a name of man that I took position: I wanted to fight against the attitude of the man while taking his coat. It is still necessary today to take a stand on certain subjects and especially on the place of women in society. We can see that in many countries we are more and more open to the status of women, but in Italy, it is more difficult, because we have a strong link with religion, because of the presence of the Vatican. It is true that the last pope is more open, even if men have privileges that they do not want to lose.

When did you create this alphabet that you used for the set of the show?
I started working on it in 1975, but it was finished in 1996. Each letter is made up of my own body. I did not want to show my face. I did not want this work to be related to my own person. It was not important: what mattered was the position. I wanted to make it as an alphabet for kids, as we learn letters at school. I wrote a poem that is like an acrostic: every word starts with one of the letters of the alphabet in the order: A, B, C, D, and so on. " Abbiamo Bisogno Come Donne E Femministe Gestirci Hanno Impunemente Lordato Mondo Non Operando Positivamente Questa Rivolta Segna Tuttavia Una Vittoria Zittita. "(We need as women and feminists to deal with the seigniory disorders.) The world does not work positively, but this revolt marks a silent victory, editor's note). And we transcribed it with the alphabet for the parade.

How did Maria Grazia Chiuri come to ask you to make the set for the last show?
I exhibited my alphabet in a gallery, Maria Grazia saw it, she was surprised because for this collection, she wanted to question the place of the body of women and feminism. But she was looking for an artist who had explored this theme. It was a continuation of appointments. Life is made of these hazardous and happy encounters. This is the first time I worked with the fashion world.

How does your work fit into Dior's clothing collection?
I like doing strange things and find that in Maria Grazia's clothes. In this collection, she refers to the Teddy Girls of the 1960, but there are many things that combine and resemble my work: a mix of styles, references to the past, combined to meet the present.

Dior X Tomaso Binga: When the spirit of feminism takes hold of fashion

February 28 2019

[Click on the image to see the gallery]

Fashion Week, Paris: Maria Grazia Chiuri invited Italian feminist artist Tomaso Binga to Dior to stage the autumn-winter XNUMX-XNUMX show. The artistic director of the house continues to build her vocabulary, summoning some silhouettes of the past to find an answer to the questions of our time, including the place of women in society. To support her remarks, she summoned a figure of feminism: Tomaso Binga and her famous Alfabetiere murale . - Isabelle Cerboneschi , meet her in Paris.

In the garden of Musée Rodin, a white, rectangular building, sports the letters DIOR written in a particular alphabet: each letter is formed by a body of naked woman, the body of the Italian artist Tomaso Binga. It is to her that Maria Grazia Chiuri, Dior's artistic director called on the scenography for the 2019-20 fall-winter ready-to-wear fashion show. Since her arrival Dior dear, the Italian designer uses the podium to scroll not only clothes but also feminist slogans. "We should all be feminist", was it written on a T-Shirt during his first collection. "Sisterhood is Powerful" reads the first look of the show. A sort of revolution upside down that, if it were to take place, would come down from the courtyard to the street.

For this fall-winter collection 2019-20 she was inspired by the figures of the Teddy Girls, the female counterparts of the Teddy Boys in the 1950, one of the first subcultures that emerged in England. Their style was a joyful blend of Edwardian rock and roll. They wore men's jackets, leather jackets, rolled up jeans, DA-style hairstyles and were in revolt against post-war austerity.

It is these figures of rebellious women who inspired Maria Grazia Chiuri. There is a trace of this in the use of tartan, which later became part of the punks' uniform. She revisits the tailor's line and gives it a more masculine look. It rethinks the black jacket created by Yves Saint Laurent for Dior and the Miss Dior dress of the late 1940, and it does something else: a look that seems cut for Millennials rich and (a little) rebellious. Not to mention the famous T-Shirts with themes. The show opens with the words of the American poet Robin Morgan dating from 1984: "Sisterhood is Global".

And to support her words, Maria Grazia Chiuri asked the Italian artist Tomaso Binga to create the scenography of the parade. Bianca Pucciarelli Menna, his real name, was born in Salerno in 1931. But it was when she chose to rename Tomaso, a name she borrowed from the poet Filippo Tommaso Marinetti (1876-1944), that she reinvented herself and chose to build a protest and feminist work, She was shocked by the way women were treated, and still treated, in her country and elsewhere. Installed in Rome in the 1970 years, she intended to shake the established order through disturbing happenings, using disguise. During one of these artistic moments, she even disguised herself as a pope and invited the audience to confess their sins and give them absolution.

In 1976, the artist created " l’Alfabetiere murale », a vast collage in which letters of the alphabet and her own body mix with each other, which she contorsions to make her represent a letter of the alphabet. This work is meant to be a critique of the use of women's bodies "that men use to advertise cars and many other things," she says. Thomas Binga opened the parade with this sentence: "As women and feminists we must manage ourselves and this revolt will be our silent victory". She was surrounded by two models wearing slogan t-shirts: "Sisterhood is global" and "Sisterhood is Powerful", in tribute to the works of the poet Robin Morgan, whose work is based on the concept of sorority. On the day of the parade, the artist wore a dress that she had made herself with two dresses, one of which had become too small. And that made her laugh. Meet.

IC: Is fashion a language that can destroy stereotypes?
Tomaso Binga: Fashion can be political, but it has to find different channels as well as it's not just business.

Why take a male name?
It was a provocation. It was also a performance. All women who work in art did not need to change their name. It was by taking a name of man that I took position: I wanted to fight against the attitude of the man while taking his coat. It is still necessary today to take a stand on certain subjects and especially on the place of women in society. We can see that in many countries we are more and more open to the status of women, but in Italy, it is more difficult, because we have a strong link with religion, because of the presence of the Vatican. It is true that the last pope is more open, even if men have privileges that they do not want to lose.

When did you create this alphabet that you used for the set of the show?
I started working on it in 1975, but it was finished in 1996. Each letter is made up of my own body. I did not want to show my face. I did not want this work to be related to my own person. It was not important: what mattered was the position. I wanted to make it as an alphabet for kids, as we learn letters at school. I wrote a poem that is like an acrostic: every word starts with one of the letters of the alphabet in the order: A, B, C, D, and so on. " Abbiamo Bisogno Come Donne E Femministe Gestirci Hanno Impunemente Lordato Mondo Non Operando Positivamente Questa Rivolta Segna Tuttavia Una Vittoria Zittita. "(We need as women and feminists to deal with the seigniory disorders.) The world does not work positively, but this revolt marks a silent victory, editor's note). And we transcribed it with the alphabet for the parade.

How did Maria Grazia Chiuri come to ask you to make the set for the last show?
I exhibited my alphabet in a gallery, Maria Grazia saw it, she was surprised because for this collection, she wanted to question the place of the body of women and feminism. But she was looking for an artist who had explored this theme. It was a continuation of appointments. Life is made of these hazardous and happy encounters. This is the first time I worked with the fashion world.

How does your work fit into Dior's clothing collection?
I like doing strange things and find that in Maria Grazia's clothes. In this collection, she refers to the Teddy Girls of the 1960, but there are many things that combine and resemble my work: a mix of styles, references to the past, combined to meet the present.